Sunday, 29 Jan 2023

Trump is running for president again but these legal battles might stand in the way

Trump is running for president again but these legal battles might stand in the way


Trump is running for president again  but these legal battles might stand in the way

Donald Trump has announced his third run for president, a move likely to be as norm-shattering as his successful 2016 campaign.

But a new twist is the sheer size and scale of the legal jeopardy that now surrounds him. Federal and state authorities are investigating Trump's personal, political and financial conduct, and that of his business empire.

How any indictment would affect Trump's run remains unclear - he is experienced in fighting delaying actions in the courts and in using political or investigatory moves against him as fuel to fire up his base.

Here's where things stand.

The House committee investigating the Capitol attack, which Trump incited, has not issued its final report. But its seven Democrats and two Republicans have laid out in detail Trump's conduct after election day and around the assault on Congress. The committee has served Trump with a subpoena. Trump had a deadline of 14 November to respond, then filed suit to avoid having to do so. Committee members have indicated they do not expect to make a criminal referral to the justice department.

Should Republicans retake the House, as expected, the committee can expect to be shuttered. But the justice department's January 6 investigation goes on. It has produced charges, convictions and sentences for people who took part in the attack. Trials of far-right figures have produced evidence of links to the White House. But as yet, the investigation has shown no public sign of reaching Trump himself. That said, a quickening has been reported, subpoenas reaching Trump advisers. Notionally, the attorney general, Merrick Garland, has until 2024 to indict Trump.

The justice department is also investigating Trump's legal and political scheming to overturn results in key states or to block certification, on which the House committee has shed considerable light.

you may also like